Marie Sklodowska-Curie Scholarship Program: First graduates opened as a new round of applications

Marie Sklodowska-Curie Scholarship Program: First graduates opened as a new round of applications



During your bachelor’s degree at the Moscow State Institute for International Relations, Inna Rodina informed herself about the worldwide efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and international cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Determined to follow her dream of making the world a safer and more peaceful place, she immersed herself in it.

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During your bachelor’s degree at the Moscow State Institute for International Relations, Inna Rodina informed herself about the worldwide efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and international cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Determined to follow her dream of making the world a safer and more peaceful place, she immersed herself in it.

In 2019, for example, she enrolled for the master’s degree in Non-Proliferation and Terrorism Studies at. a US Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Montereywhile juggling her time at work to support herself financially. But things changed when a friend told her about a scholarship to support women studying in the nuclear field. She applied and was one of 100 recipients of the new IAEA scholarship under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Scholarship Program (MSCFP) launched last year.

And in June of this year, Rodina became the first scholarship holder to graduate. Her master’s thesis, entitled Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy: Prospects, Challenges and Legal Models for Russian Cooperation with the Middle East, is based on the research she did during her studies and the access she had to some of the world’s most renowned nuclear specialists .

“Thanks to the scholarship, I had the opportunity to concentrate on studying instead of thinking about making money to pay for accommodation,” says 23-year-old Rodina. “I was able to concentrate fully on my studies and my research, achieve great scientific results and publish several of my research papers.” The 2020 cohort of 100 scholarship holders comes from 71 countries and several historically male-dominated disciplines, from nuclear technology and operations to nuclear medicine and radiation protection.

“A good knowledge of nuclear-related processes not only offers many career opportunities, but also skills to make a real difference and contribute to a better world for all,” said Rodina. “I believe that the situation is different today than it was a few years ago: women who are interested in nuclear topics have significantly fewer obstacles in realizing their dreams and becoming nuclear specialists.”

Later that year, Rodina will be doing an internship in the IAEA’s Security Measures Division. She plans to look for opportunities in the industry to gain more experience before advancing her career in an international institution to address pressing world problems such as the threat of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and violent extremism.

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