Scientists say climate change helped dry up grasslands that fueled the Colorado fire

Scientists say climate change helped dry up grasslands that fueled the Colorado fire


A scientist has highlighted the role of climate change in the devastating wildfire in Colorado that wiped out several cities and forced thousands of people to flee.

Natasha Stavros, director of the Earth Lab Analytics Hub and fire scientist investigating mega-fires at the University of Colorado-Boulder, says, “This type of event that happens in December with a lot of rain to boost fuel levels earlier in the year and then No rain later in the year to dry them out is very much related to climate change. “

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A scientist has highlighted the role of climate change in the devastating wildfire in Colorado that wiped out several cities and forced thousands of people to flee.

Natasha Stavros, director of the Earth Lab Analytics Hub and fire scientist investigating mega-fires at the University of Colorado-Boulder, says, “This type of event that happens in December with a lot of rain to boost fuel levels earlier in the year and then No rain later in the year to dry them out is very much related to climate change. “

Also read | Fast-paced Colorado forest fires destroy hundreds of homes and result in mass evacuations

“As we evolve further into the wild, we really need to think about how we are going to make this development – both in terms of energy supplies, the type of wind we would expect, and how we are using and around this land to preserve these urban areas and what ignition sources we bring, “she said.

Boulder County saw above-average rainfall in May and July last year, which gave the county’s grasses plenty of water to grow, according to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

That rainfall decreased dramatically in August and stayed below historical average for the remainder of the year as the county entered winter with little to no rainfall, causing the grasses surrounding the cities to dry up, which they did made more flammable for fire.

Although fires are a natural part of the climate cycle and help clean up dead bush, their scope and intensity are increasing.

Scientists say global warming, mainly caused by human activities such as the unchecked burning of fossil fuels, is changing weather patterns.

Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle told journalists that one person has been found and two are still feared dead after the fire.

(With contributions from agencies)

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