The USA and EU promise 30 percent less methane emissions

The USA and EU promise 30 percent less methane emissions


The United States and the European Union shared the joy on Friday of cutting global methane emissions by nearly a third over the next decade. The climate experts rate this as one of the most significant steps to date towards fulfilling the Paris Climate Agreement.

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The United States and the European Union shared the joy on Friday of cutting global methane emissions by nearly a third over the next decade. The climate experts rate this as one of the most significant steps to date towards fulfilling the Paris Climate Agreement.

This happened after UN Secretary General António Guterres warned of a “high risk of failure” at the important UN climate talks Cop26 in Glasgow in November.

According to the US-EU plan, a target has been set to reduce at least 30 percent of global methane emissions by 2030, based on 2020 levels.

If rolled out globally, this would reduce global warming by 0.2 ° C by 2040, compared to likely temperature increases by then. The world is around 1.2 degrees hotter today than it was in pre-industrial times.

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Boris Johnson said the UK would be one of the first to join the US-EU methane pledge if it opens to more signatories at Cop26.

Speaking at a meeting of leaders of major economies on Friday, he said: “Over the past 30 years the UK has cut methane emissions by around 60%. And there are good commercial uses for methane, you can use it to make fabrics, you can use it to make antifreeze. So the world could reduce its emissions of this powerful greenhouse gas tomorrow if we wanted to. “

Also, the UN released a report showing that national governments’ current emissions pledges would lead to emissions increasing by 16 percent in 2030 compared to 2010, while scientists warn that emissions will have to decrease by 45 percent in the period to stay within 1.5 ° C.

The OECD released another report showing that climate finance funding from private and public sources flowing from the rich world to developing countries is down about $ 20 billion below its long-term target of $ 100 billion a year lies.

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