COVID-19: Delta variant increases the risk of death by 133 percent

COVID-19: Delta variant increases the risk of death by 133 percent


Further evidence of the significantly greater virulence of the worrying SARS-CoV-2 variations is provided by a Canadian study, with the Delta strain proving to be the deadliest to date.

The increased infectivity of the Delta variant was recognized early on on its way to becoming the world’s dominant variety.

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Further evidence of the significantly greater virulence of the worrying SARS-CoV-2 variations is provided by a Canadian study, with the Delta strain proving to be the deadliest to date.

The increased infectivity of the Delta variant was recognized early on on its way to becoming the world’s dominant variety.

However, there is evidence that the variation also increases the likelihood of more serious outcomes, especially in younger age groups, according to a large study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto.

They found that people infected with the alpha variant, which triggered the province’s third wave in early spring, as well as the beta and gamma variants, were hospitalized 52% more often, needed an intensive care unit 89% more often, and 51% more likely to die from the virus than those who contracted the virus in early 2020.

Compared to the original virus strain, Delta patients had a 108 percent higher risk of hospitalization, a 235 percent higher risk of admission to the intensive care unit, and a 133 percent higher risk of death.

The researchers found that people infected with the variants in question were significantly younger and had fewer comorbidities than people infected with non-variant infections, and that the increased risk of adverse effects from variants even after the researchers adjusted persisted in terms of age, gender, comorbidities, and other factors.

(With contributions from agencies)

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