Floods in China: How is Henan Province inundated by historic rainfall?

Floods in China: How is Henan Province inundated by historic rainfall?



The heaviest rainfall ever recorded in Henan

Precipitation in the central Chinese province reached unprecedented levels and resulted in floods of an intensity not seen in decades. Henan has many cultural sites and is an important location for industry and agriculture.

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The heaviest rainfall ever recorded in Henan

Precipitation in the central Chinese province reached unprecedented levels and resulted in floods of an intensity not seen in decades. Henan has many cultural sites and is an important location for industry and agriculture.

Comparison of the rains

The rains intensified after July 17, and Zhengzhou received one year’s rains in just three days. Across the world, countries in Europe have also seen widespread devastation recently following record rainfall. In Germany fell on 14./15. July 100-150 mm of rain within 24 hours, killing around 200 people.

A comparison of rainfall in Henan

China is used to summer flooding, but it is believed that a combination of weather patterns and climate change related to human behavior contributed to the excessive rainfall and its longer-than-usual duration in some regions. “We cannot say that a single extreme weather event is directly caused by climate change, but over the long term global warming has increased the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events,” said Song Lianchun, a meteorologist at the National Climate Center.

Typhoon in-fa

It is the sixth tropical storm and the third typhoon in the Northwest Pacific region this year. The combined effects of the typhoon air currents and a high pressure area in the Pacific created the heavy rain that caused devastating flooding around 1,000 km (621 miles) inland in Henan Province.

Edited by Helen Leavey and Melissa Zhu
Creative director Darren Long

Sources: National Meteorological Center, German Weather Service, Hong Kong Observatory, Zoom.Earth

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