Hungary holds referendum on controversial anti-LGBTQIA + law, said Prime Minister Orban


Hungary is expected to hold a referendum on the controversial LGBTQIA + law, Prime Minister Viktor Orban said on Wednesday.

The law has been criticized worldwide and this move may have been triggered by the decision of the European Commission to take legal action against Budest.

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Hungary is expected to hold a referendum on the controversial LGBTQIA + law, Prime Minister Viktor Orban said on Wednesday.

The law has been criticized worldwide and this move may have been triggered by the decision of the European Commission to take legal action against Budest.

In a video shared by Orban on his Facebook page, he said that “Brussels has clearly attacked Hungary over the last few weeks over the law”.

The law prohibits the “portrayal or promotion” of homosexuals and the scope of gender correction for anyone under the age of 18. The move has generated a lot of scorn across Europe.

Budest claims the measure was created to protect children in the country. However, critics claim that the law fuses pedophilia with homosexuality, effectively spreading stigma in an already heavily ostracized community.

Also read: EU takes legal action against Hungary and Poland over LGBTQ rights

Orban said the referendum would include five questions, one of which would be whether schools should be allowed to talk to their children about sexuality without their consent.

Another question that respondents will ask is whether they are in favor of sex reassignment treatment for minors and whether they accept the unrestricted exposure of children to “harmful sexual content”.

The right-wing prime minister urged all participants to answer “no”.

A date for the referendum has not yet been set. Orban presented the idea as a list of the European Union’s demands on Hungary.

Also read: How Hungary’s annual drag competition goes under the shadow of the anti-LGBTQIA + law

The law sparked protests not in Hungary but in the rest of the European Union. The European Commission has initiated infringement proceedings against the law that came into force this month. The trial alleges that the law violates EU rules on freedom of expression, trade and the provision of services.

Hungary accuses the EU of meddling in the country’s internal affairs.

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