IAEA and C / may join forces to improve access to quality radiation medicine for cancer treatment

IAEA and C / may join forces to improve access to quality radiation medicine for cancer treatment



The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the City Cancer Challenge Foundation (C / Can) have agreed to expand the collaboration to improve access to equitable, high-quality radiation medicine for cancer patients in low- and middle-income cities.

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The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the City Cancer Challenge Foundation (C / Can) have agreed to expand the collaboration to improve access to equitable, high-quality radiation medicine for cancer patients in low- and middle-income cities.

In an agreement signed today, the two organizations formalized a partnership to improve the sharing of expertise, skills and resources and achieve greater impact in the use of radiation medicine in the treatment of cancer.

“This partnership demonstrates the IAEA’s commitment to global partners to accelerate the adoption of nuclear technologies to fight cancer effectively and sustainably,” said IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of Technical Cooperation, Liu Hua. “We look forward to enhancing collaboration on technical collaboration activities, cancer control evaluation and research initiatives through this partnership for the benefit of our Member States.”

“C / Can has the privilege of relying on experts, recommended by the IAEA since 2018, to help cities develop radiation therapy development plans and radiation quality assurance programs in C / Can cities,” said Susan Henshall, CEO of C / Can. “The agreement creates a framework between the two organizations to expand areas of collaboration, such as needs assessment, data collection and resource mobilization.”

Specific activities of this collaboration include helping low and middle income C / Can cities develop mechanisms to ensure patient-centered and standardized care through multidisciplinary medical approaches. The partnership also envisages the participation and integration of IAEA experts in multidisciplinary global teams to review resource-appropriate guidelines for the management of the most common and curable cancers.

In addition, both organizations will facilitate technical collaboration on developing radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging development plans and quality assurance programs in C / Can cities.

The IAEA assists Member States in using nuclear and radiation medicine to diagnose and treat a range of non-communicable diseases, including cancer. The agency coordinates research projects and provides the countries with specialist knowledge, training and equipment as well as internationally harmonized safety guidelines.

C / Can helps cities around the world improve access to equitable, quality cancer care. Since its launch in 2017 by the Union for the Fight against Cancer International (UICC), C / Can has developed a new model for access to cancer care, which the city is using for the first time as a key element in health systems response to cancer.

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