IAEA and FAO are helping Burkina Faso and Algeria improve food safety

IAEA and FAO are helping Burkina Faso and Algeria improve food safety



Tiny but oil and vitamin-rich sesame seeds have become an integral part of Burkina Faso’s economy – they create jobs and generate income. After cotton, the edible seeds that grow in pods are the second most widely exported agricultural product of the West African country. This sprouting success of the past decade has been supported with the help of the National Public Health Laboratory (LNSP) in Burkina Faso, which is supported by the IAEA and FAO through their Joint Center on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture.

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Tiny but oil and vitamin-rich sesame seeds have become an integral part of Burkina Faso’s economy – they create jobs and generate income. After cotton, the edible seeds that grow in pods are the second most widely exported agricultural product of the West African country. This sprouting success of the past decade has been supported with the help of the National Public Health Laboratory (LNSP) in Burkina Faso, which is supported by the IAEA and FAO through their Joint Center on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture.

The main task of the LNSP, founded in 1999, is to ensure the safety and quality of imported and exported food. Sesame exports have strict pesticide residue regulations and in recent years the laboratory has played an important role in ensuring that the country’s exports meet food safety and quality standards. From 2010 to 2016 alone, sesame exports made up around 47 percent of agricultural product exports. Total exports increased from 20,600 tons in 2007 to 160,000 tons in 2016 and to 183,786 tons in 2018, with export revenues exceeding $ 170 million.

“LNSP contributed to this achievement by performing the safety and quality control of sesame seeds, and this was also possible with the support of the IAEA in collaboration with the FAO,” said Bernadette P. Sourabie, director of technical coordination and quality management at LNSP . However, the laboratory needed to further improve its analytical skills so that low-cost, low-cost screening capabilities could be applied to a wider range of chemical hazards in food.

Since 2018, as part of its technical cooperation program, the IAEA has provided additional analytical equipment, including a radioreceptor assay instrument, and trains a pool of analysts in the testing of three groups of chemical hazards: mycotoxins, pesticide residues and veterinary drug residues in food, animal and vegetable products Origin. Analytical method protocols have also been provided to improve the testing program.

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