In the midst of the AUKUS series, concerns about overfishing by Chinese ships on the high seas are growing

In the midst of the AUKUS series, concerns about overfishing by Chinese ships on the high seas are growing


Amid concern over aggressive Chinese actions in the South China SeaThere have been reports of growing concern about Chinese ships overfishing in the high seas.

Several hundred Chinese fishing trawlers have been discovered nearby Galagos Islands last year when ships reportedly traveled thousands of miles each year looking for squid.

Read more on In the midst of the AUKUS series, concerns about overfishing by Chinese ships on the high seas are growing…


Amid concern over aggressive Chinese actions in the South China SeaThere have been reports of growing concern about Chinese ships overfishing in the high seas.

Several hundred Chinese fishing trawlers have been discovered nearby Galagos Islands last year when ships reportedly traveled thousands of miles each year looking for squid.

There have also been reports of illegal fishing with reported looting of tuna and sharks by Chinese ships.

According to the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization (SPRFMO), Chinese ships in the South Pacific rose over the past year with over 550 ships weighing tons fish.

Also read: China temporarily bans octopus fishing in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimated in 2016 that there were 4.6 million fishing vessels worldwide. The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) had a report of unregulated fishing in the Indian Ocean was on the rise.

WWF noted that fishing off the Omani coast has increased several times, mainly from Chinese flag Ships.

According to reports, Chinese ships are increasingly sailing the high seas due to the decline in fish population, although the demand for a wide variety of fish in the country continues to grow.

The increased activity of China’s ships throughout Pacific and Atlantic Comes as the United States and Australia sign a defense pact to allow Canberra to manufacture nuclear submarines.

The move is widely interpreted as a move to curb China’s activities on the high seas and keep an eye on its activities in the Pacific.

(With contributions from agencies)

.

COMMENTS