The UK ranks consistently in the bottom 10% of nations on biodiversity integrity

The UK ranks consistently in the bottom 10% of nations on biodiversity integrity


A new study found that almost half of Britain’s natural biodiversity has disappeared over the centuries. Agriculture and urban expansion triggered by the industrial and agricultural revolution are believed to be the main causes of this loss.

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A new study found that almost half of Britain’s natural biodiversity has disappeared over the centuries. Agriculture and urban expansion triggered by the industrial and agricultural revolution are believed to be the main causes of this loss.

Scientists at London’s Natural History Museum have found that the UK is one of the worst-rated countries in the world.

Professor Andy Purvis of the Museum’s Life Science Department was quoted by the Guardian as saying, “Britain has lost more of its natural biodiversity than almost anywhere else in Western Europe, most of all G7 countries and more than many other nations such as China.”

The study will serve as a basis for negotiating the preparation of the online discussions for this week’s UN Conference on Biodiversity (Cop15).

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Following these discussions, an international biodiversity summit is to take place in Kunming, China, next year.

The aim is to set firm goals that would end the loss of wildlife.

Dr. Adriana De Palma, a senior researcher at the museum, said the analysis found the UK consistently ranks in the bottom 10 percent of nations for biodiversity integrity. This is because the agricultural and industrial revolution began in Britain.

Across Britain, forests and grasslands have been demolished and single-crop fields planted in their place.

In addition, more than two-thirds of the UK is now agricultural and 8 percent is built on. That leaves very little room for nature.

The worldwide intactness of biodiversity is estimated at 75 percent. This is significantly lower than the 90 percent average, which is considered a safe limit to ensure the planet doesn’t fall into an ecological recession.

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