USA and EU reject proposal to redesign the borders in the Western Balkans

USA and EU reject proposal to redesign the borders in the Western Balkans


The United States and the European Union rejected the idea of ​​redrawing the borders in the Western Balkans on Monday.

A proposal has reportedly been circulating among EU officials to break up Bosnia and merge Kosovo with Albania. According to the document, parts of Bosnia in Serbia and Croatia are also to be included in order to support the integration of the region into the European Union.

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The United States and the European Union rejected the idea of ​​redrawing the borders in the Western Balkans on Monday.

A proposal has reportedly been circulating among EU officials to break up Bosnia and merge Kosovo with Albania. According to the document, parts of Bosnia in Serbia and Croatia are also to be included in order to support the integration of the region into the European Union.

The authenticity of the endorsement has so far been verified by officials and no country has so far made this claim. Bosnia was alarmed by the discussion because the country had experienced ethnic conflict two decades ago.

“We are absolutely not in favor of changing the borders,” said the chief spokesman for the European Commission, Eric Mamer, during a press conference. The US also warned that changing the borders could lead to further tensions in the region.

“Recent unjustified speculation about ethnic border changes in the Balkans can fuel instability in the region and bring back memories of past tensions,” said Ned Price, spokesman for the US State Department.

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Two of the former Yugoslav republics have joined the EU so far – Croatia and Slovenia. Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia, Albania, Bosnia and Kosovo also hope to join the bloc at some point.

The EU has urged countries to resolve their conflicts and promote democracy before considering joining the Union. However, the EU sees the importance of the region, where Russia and China are rapidly expanding their influence.

The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, held talks with the Serbian President Alexander Vucic in Brussels on Monday and declared that the bloc wanted to see “positive developments in the rule of law” in Serbia.

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Both discussed, among other things, Belgrade’s interaction with Kosovo, which was formerly part of Serbia. Kosovo’s independence is not recognized by several EU countries, including Spain.

The representatives of North Macedonia and Kosovo will also gain a foothold in Brussels later this week.

Von der Leyen also supported the construction of a railway line between Belgrade and North Macedonia in the hope of officially opening accession negotiations with the European Union, which stalled last year after a Bulgarian veto.

(With contributions from agencies)

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